Non Sequiturs: 01.13.19

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* A happy 200th birthday to Cravath, which celebrates its bicentennial in 2019 (and which has launched a sharp-looking, historically rich microsite for the occasion). [Cravath/200]

* According to Dayvon Love, “the policy response from mainstream political institutions and the Democratic Leadership in Maryland to the issue of gun violence and homicide in the Black community is mired in racism.” [Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle]

* The current Term of the Supreme Court doesn’t boast many blockbusters — but some cases are more interesting than others, as Adam Feldman points out. [Empirical SCOTUS]

* Illegal aliens, guns, and strict liability, oh my! Eugene Volokh breaks down Rehaif v. United States, which SCOTUS just agreed to hear. [Volokh Conspiracy / Reason]

* The Supreme Court has taken an increased interest in intellectual property in recent years — and if it wants to tackle issues of copyright infringement in the digital age, Capitol Records v. ReDigi could be a good vehicle. [All Rights Reserved]

* Speaking of supreme courts, Florida’s is likely to shift rightward, as Ed Whelan explains. [Bench Memos / National Review]

* If you’re getting lots of questions from friends and family about the constitutional law of shutdowns, check out this helpful explainer from Zachary Price. [Take Care]

* And if you have thoughts on what legal publishers got right and wrong in 2018, Jean O’Grady would like to hear from you. [Dewey B Strategic]

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